Modern History of Judaism (revised)

Written by Marcus Daitch (AKA Classicalfan626). Introduction The following paragraphs show a rough idea of a 2nd proposed change in history, the 1st one being about physically/genetically equating cat and dog years with human years, going back thousands or a million or more years. To take a look at the 1st change, go to this article. The 2nd one here is about modern Judaism, going back as early as the 6th century, roughly between 500 and 599 CE. Simon of Rome (500-551 CE) The modern history of Judaism among Eastern Slavic peoples begins in the 6th century with the reforms

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Cats & Dogs Living Into Their 70s, 80s, 90s, & Beyond

Written by Marcus Daitch (AKA Classicalfan626). Introduction From my personal experience, when people who are into time travel discuss the idea, they most often talk about theories behind the time travel concept or paradoxes (such as the Grandfather Paradox). When they talk about actually changing the past (or changing history), they more often than not want to fix a mistake they made in the past. I differ from these people because although I have a rough idea on how to go back in time and change history, I’d rather not get into too many details there; I also differ since

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Theories and Concepts from Dr. VonSchnelling

The question everyone wants answered is this: How do you travel in time? It is a simple question, but the answer is not quite as simple. Where to begin? There are so many aspects. Let’s begin with how time is calculated. Relative Time (the Universal Time Factor) To travel in time you will require computer hardware and software that is probably beyond the technology presently available to us. But all the silicon in the world won’t help you overcome the biggest hurdle for the hardware. Dr. VonSchnelling puts it best: As I told my friend Albert, time is relative. A zecond

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What is the Grandfather Paradox?

If you’ve ever seen Back to the Future, you probably know that you shouldn’t be messing with things your parents did before you were born. At least, not unless you want to erase yourself from existence. The plot of Robert Zemeckis’ 1985 blockbuster is an excellent example of the Grandfather Paradox. However, the concept is much richer and more profound than that. The Grandfather Paradox is a self-canceling contradiction that arises from changing the past. A person who travels through time to and kills their grandfather before the birth of their own parents is the classic example. The change caused

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